Bottled Water of the World

FINEWATERS Guide Book
A Connoisseur's Guide to the World of Premium Bottled Waters
By Michael Mascha

Reviews 100 of the world’s best-loved bottled water brands, their sources, composition, flavors, and historical backgrounds, along with expert analysis and full-color photos throughout.

ISBN 9781624545989 | US $ 24.95

FINEWATERS Guide Book

Oregon Rain Print Email

Rain Water - Still

Oregon Rain Bottled Water

Oregon Rain Description:


Balance Still Still
Minerality Super Low
Orientation Neutral
Hardness Soft
Carbonation A
Vintage very young

 

Oregon Rain Analysis:


11 TDS
7.39 ph factor
ND Arsenic
ND Chloride
ND Copper
ND Fluordine
ND Iron
0.012 Maganese
ND Nitrate
ND Sulphates
ND Zinc
milligrams per liter (mg/l)

For more details see: Minerals and Mineral Water & Sparkling Water

Country of Origin:  USA
Region:  Oregon
Place Name:  Newberg
Established:  2004
Company: 
Web Site: 
phone: 
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Oregon Rain

Oregon Rain calls it's water “Virgin Water” because it has never been touched by the earth.

It is pure rainwater, harvested from Oregon Skies on sterile sheets and then filtered, and pasteurized to ensure uniform quality and purity.

Every batch of water harvested by Oregon Rain is tested and an example of the test results are included on their website.

Oregon Rain is Arsenic, Chlorine, Chromium 6, MTBE and Fluoride free prior to processing, which saves up to eleven hours per bottle and allows Oregon Rain to deliver it's product at a competitive price. Many rightly call Oregon Rain, heaven in a glass.


The History of Oregon Rain
Oregon Rain was incorporated in January of 2004 and began delivering products in April of the same year. This was preceded by a year of experimentation in the back yard of Dan McGee, one of the founders who harvested and bottled water to give away to people in order to gauge the reaction of the public to drinking Oregon Rain.

The first thing McGee realized was that everyone who received a bottle gave positive feedback and even people who claimed to hate water as a drink, liked Oregon Rain. This encouragement from the public led to follow up activities including a full “Appendix A” test of the water source, as required by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration.